Archives

  • East Bay Indigenous History Resources

    Where to find Selected Primary and Secondary Sources regarding the Native American (Indigenous) History of the East Bay. Sources for the studious, tenacious, and determined, scholars. Muwekma Ohlone Tribe Muwekma Ohlone Tribal Recognition Process US DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs, Petition #111 Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of San Francisco Bay, CA Muwekma Tribal Publications (Research Documents)Featuring…

  • Alternatives to Shuumi (2023)

    Wondering which Native American organizations you should give to on Giving Tuesday? Hopefully, when you read this, you already know that Shuumi Land Tax doesn’t really go to all Ohlone people. (But we don’t want to discourage your well-meaning intent and your need to help Indigenous people in anyway you can.) If you really want…

  • Scarcity Mindset As A Hurdle to Museum Accountability

    By now there should be no doubt that most museums, which display or hold Native American artifacts, directly benefit from grave robbing, or the often racist, prejudiced language and ignorant beliefs regarding Native Americans first uttered by now dead anthropologists [like Alfred Kroeber], and perpetuated by the ailing volunteers and aging septuagenarians responsible for interpreting…

  • Beyond Land Acknowledgment

    Alameda Native History Project has a standing policy to never contact or involve Tribal Members or Tribes unless there is a clear and tangential Tribal Benefit To Participation. Truthfully, the reason why this policy was set was mostly out of respect for the lived experiences of the Tribal Members of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of…

  • 99% of Alameda Museum’s Ohlone Artifacts Were Stolen from Native American Graves

    We’ve found a pattern of reckless and careless treatment of 100% of those stolen artifacts. The Alameda Museum has roughly 186 Native American Artifacts. All of those artifacts were found in connection with Native American Graves, except for 2. So, we can’t say ALL of the artifacts are grave goods. But we can say: 99.93%…

  • Alameda Museum Contract Expires

    Should the City renew the agreement? On Monday, September 4, 2023, the City of Alameda’s five-year agreement with the Alameda Museum to provide archival storage expired. According to the agreement, the Alameda Museum, as an Independent Contractor, would provide the following: The agreement made it clear the Alameda Museum is a Service Provider; and not…

  • Elizabeth Hoover Should Resign

    May 1, 2023, Elizabeth Hoover issues a statement admitting that she used her non-existent Mohawk and Mi’kmaq ancestry to get to where she is today… But it was her “experience and expertise” which helped her become a professor–not the fact that she gained said experience an expertise from impersonating an indigenous person. This isn’t the…

  • Landback Wildflower Mix

    What’s Inside Planting Instructions How To Get the Landback Wildflower Mix A mix of hand-collected Native California Plants chosen for the semi-arid climate of Alameda, and places like it, below 1,000 feet. All of them are full sun; except for the Tomcat Clover, which is happiest with a little soil moisture. Tomcat CloverTrifolium willdenovii Credit:…

  • What about the East Bay Ohlone of Oakland, Emeryville, Alameda?

    Someone recently responded to the article “Who are the Lisjan Ohlone? What does Chochenyo mean?” with some questions of their own. What about the East Bay Ohlone of Oakland, Emeryville, Alameda? [The] Muwekma are not the only Lisjan in the area. B. Richman I publicly responded: [B.] Richman this article seeks to educate people like…

  • Shellmounds and Their Relationship to the Waterbodies of the San Francisco Bay Basin

    In the Indigenous Bay Area, water and life have always gone hand-in-hand. It was impossible to tell where the sea truly ended on this coast. Even inland, the San Francisco Regions’s natural aquatic resources are used with reverence, and traded throughout the region (and beyond.) Salmon connect the sea to the rivers, streams, and lakes…